Student Loan Default

Posted on 15 May 2012 by Mark


Hi - Me and my partner are looking into getting a mortgage. We have a joint income of £110K and approximately £40K deposit. We would be looking at borrowing around 250-280K. Neither of us have any debts - my partner has a very clean credit record, though I have a five year old settled default on student loans (which I didn't realise I had until last year). Other than that I've had a few missed credit card payments but none in the last three years. What are our chances of getting a mortgage? Thanks.

Mark

This is a very difficult question to answer because you won't know until you try.  I suspect that as you will be wanting to borrow a relatively high proportion of the purchase price you will find it difficult.  If you were able to either save more or look at cheaper property so that you were only borrowing 75% of the value your chances would be much higher.

Although the default is 5 years old and has been settled Santander will definitely not consider you for a mortgage and the combination of missed payments and a default will put off a lot of others.  It might be worth waiting until 6 years from when the default was registered as it will then stop showing on your credit file and the missed payments will be another year older.  If you can wait and use this time to increase your deposit I think you will stand a better chance.

If however you want to go ahead now and take advantage of the current low interest rates please give us a call on 0344 346 3672.  We can research which lenders will consider you for a mortgage without you having to traipse round the High Street until you found someone and recommend the best deal available on the market for you.

Peter

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